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Fashion Yaa
5th November 2013, 06:30 AM
Well, this is one of those testy topics that I am sure you will either agree with or think of as ‘utterly senseless’, but the truth is that since Dunia Magazine provides the platform for cross cultural discussions, I thought to ‘lay it out on the table’. By confronting and discussing these things, we may actually begin to break the ice … that I am sure you agree often exists between Africans and African Americans. In as much as my intention is not to generalize or stereotype, I am writing this article based on real life experiences and events. Earlier this year, I believe in January, a client walked into my office, his name JD (I am sure he is going to read this article). For the record, JD is an African American male and I am an African female. He was a first time client, so we began to chit chat as I worked on his papers. We talked about travels and different people we had met; the conversation turned to marriage as I was obviously wearing my wedding ring; he asked if I was married to an African, I said “Yes, of course,” then he asked if my husband was a doctor. I answered ‘No’, laughing. Oh well, he says quite a few African men he knows are doctors … ha,ha,ha. That’s when he asked me why it is so uncommon to find African women who date or marry outside their culture, especially to African American men. I thought about this for a few seconds … I kinda agreed –African women do marry outside their race and culture, but it’s more common to find them married to Caucasian men. Personally, I only know a handful of girls from Africa who are married to black American men. So, wanting to know what my friends thought, I posted this question on my Facebook...http://www.duniamagazine.com/2010/12/why-african-women-dont-often-date-african-american-men/

Fashion Yaa
5th November 2013, 06:45 AM
Have you ever entered into a relationship with a black man that was not originally from the United States? We all would like to believe Q-tip’s classic line that states “black is black” but there are cultural differences that will pop-up when trying to maintain a relationship with a man orginally from Africa. We all know that Africa is a huge continent and cultures vary from country to country but here are some of the general differences that one will notice when dating a traditional African man: African men do not have the “gold-digger” issue. They will generally be more generous up front because in many African....http://hellobeautiful.com/2009/10/07/dating-a-traditional-african-man-vs-an-african-american/

Fashion Yaa
5th November 2013, 06:58 AM
http://www.mamiwata.com/ghana.htmlIn Ghana it is said, "Africa will either hug you up real nice, or chew you up and spit you out, but it will always mold you with her power." This is particularly true, for those Africans (from the diaspora) who return home with layers of romanticism about living in Africa. Of my eight visits to Africa, most have been on the West Coast, and in Ghana in particular. In fact, Ghana is the place I am currently building my dream house. Fulfilling this dream has meant continuing a process of peeling off layers of romanticism, as well as deconstructing my own westernized attitudes and behaviors. Africans from throughout the diaspora, and even on the continent itself, held myths about each other, built on centuries of separation and the distorted images we have been fed. Class issues is one factors that contributes to miscommunications and the resulting isolation that many diasporians find themselves experiencing. Similar to the 19th century historical Liberian case, where an entire elite class of diasporians came into conflict with the continental Liberians, many diasporians in Ghana don't fully benefit from the Ghanaian social/cultural experience. Only a few of them, for example, were actively trying to learn any of the local languages to bridge the separation created by our social-cultural diversity. For diasporian women, especially those married to Ghanaian men, they seem to be preoccupied with marriage and family relations. One message that rang out loud and clear, over and over again from my elder sistas, was that women of the diaspora who married Continental African men often felt like "outsiders" to his family and culture. Even women from other parts of Africa confided to me that "his family" considers