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View Full Version : Heart Disease is One of the Easiest Diseases to Prevent!



Angella
27th August 2012, 11:51 PM
Heart disease, just like type 2 diabetes, is one of the easiest diseases to prevent and avoid, BUT you simply must be proactive. I find one of the most important risk factors to be your cholesterol to HDL ratio.

Contrary to popular belief, your total cholesterol level is just about worthless in determining your risk for heart disease, unless it is close to 300 or higher. And, perhaps more importantly, you need to be aware that cholesterol is not the CAUSE of heart disease. If you become overly concerned with trying to lower your cholesterol level to some set number, you will be completely missing the real problem. In fact, I have seen a number of people with levels over 250 who actually were at low heart disease risk due to their HDL levels. Conversely, I have seen even more who had cholesterol levels under 200 that were at a very high risk of heart disease based on the following additional tests:

Your HDL/Cholesterol ratio: This percentage is a very potent heart disease risk factor. Just divide your HDL level by your cholesterol. Ideally, it should be above 24 percent. Below 10 percent, it's a significant indicator of risk for heart disease.
Your Triglyceride/HDL ratios. You can also do the same thing with your triglycerides and HDL ratio. This ratio should be below 2.
Keeping your inflammation levels low is key if you want to reduce your risk of heart disease (as well as many other chronic diseases). It's important to realize that there are different sizes of LDL cholesterol particles, and it's the LDL particle size that is relevant (which Ned Kock's modeling mentioned above indicates as well). This is because small particles get stuck easily and cause more inflammation, whereas large particles do not get stuck. Statins do not modulate LDL particle size. The only way to make sure your LDL particles are large enough to not get stuck and cause inflammation and damage is through your diet. In fact, it's one of the major things that insulin does. So rather than taking a statin drug, you really need to focus on your diet to reduce the inflammation in your body, which is aggravated by eating:

Oxidized cholesterol (cholesterol that has gone rancid, such as that from overcooked, scrambled eggs)
Sugar and grains
Foods cooked at high temperatures
Trans fats
Six Healthy Heart Tips

A few more recommendations that can have a profound impact on reducing inflammation in your body and reducing your risk of heart disease include:

Optimizing your insulin levels. If your fasting insulin level is not lower than three consider limiting or eliminating your intake of grains and sugars until you optimize your insulin level.
Optimizing your vitamin D levels. Most people are not aware that vitamin D can have a profoundly dramatic impact on lowering your risk for heart disease. Your best source of vitamin D is through your skin being exposed to the sun. In the wintertime, I recommend using a safe tanning bed. If you opt for a vitamin D supplement, make sure you're taking the right form of vitamin DD3, not D2in the appropriate amounts to reap the benefits, and remember to get your vitamin D levels tested regularly. For more information, please see this previous article.
Balancing your omega-6 to omega-3 fat ratio. Most Americans eating a standard American diet have a ratio of 25:1, which is highly unbalanced. The ideal ratio of omega-6 to omega-3 fats is 1:1. Therefore, you'll want to lower the amount of vegetable oils in your diet, and make sure you have a high-quality, animal-based source of omega-3s, such as krill oil.
Exercising regularly. Exercise a great way to lower inflammation without any of the side effects associated with medications. High intensity interval exercises are particularly beneficial
Normalizing your weight, or better yet, your waist size. If you're a woman with a waist measurement of over 35 inches or a man with a waist of over 40 inches, you probably have high inflammation. Whittling a few inches off the waist by reducing your portions and increasing activity can go a long way toward solving that problem.
Addressing your stress. Feeling stressed can create a wide variety of physiological changes, such as impairing digestion, excretion of valuable nutrients, decreasing beneficial gut flora populations, decreasing your metabolism, and raising triglycerides, cholesterol, insulin, and cortisol levels



source - Dr Mercola